Cycling for a good cause!

ǀ  TOPTICA Tuesday

Our TOPTICA colleague Bob Stevenson is cycling for a good cause since 18 years now. He's telling us today what drives him to do it...

"This past weekend they had over 6700 cyclists and 3000 volunteers participate and expect to raise an incredible $60 million. It’s the most successful athletic fundraising event in the country, and is always fun, rewarding, and inspirational. The majority of participants ride 190 miles over two days from Sturbridge Mass. to Bourne, and then to Provincetown. I’ve been riding the PMC for 18 years, and have raised over $185,000 in that time. This year I’m within striking distance of my $12,500 goal."

The Pan-Mass Challenge raises money for life-saving cancer research and treatment at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute through an annual bike-a-thon that crosses Massachusetts. Since its founding in 1980, the PMC has successfully melded support from committed cyclists, volunteers, corporate sponsors and individual contributors. All are essential to the PMC's goal and model: to attain maximum fundraising efficiency while increasing its annual gift. Our hope and aspiration is to provide Dana-Farber's doctors and researchers with the necessary resources to discover cures for all cancers.

PMC History

Established by Billy Starr in 1980 and under his direction, the PMC has grown considerably and consistently from its modest beginnings into an event that draws 6,700 cyclists from 43 states and 12 countries. Today, the Pan-Mass Challenge raises more money than any other athletic fundraising event in the country. The PMC generates more than 55 percent of the Jimmy Fund's annual revenue and it is Dana-Farber's single largest contributor. Over the past 39 years, PMC cyclists have ridden to raise and contribute $654 million to cancer research.
The now nationally recognized PMC is a tribute to Starr's unending desire to achieve, make a difference, and raise money for cancer research. It is also a model for all athletic fundraising events, setting the pace for a now $5 billion industry.

To learn more, visit Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.